Question: Is The Treaty Of Waitangi Fair?

What does the Treaty of Waitangi mean to me?

Signed in 1840, Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) is an agreement between some Māori leaders and the Crown.

give Māori full ownership of their lands, forestries, fisheries, taonga (treasures) and possessions.

give the Crown exclusive rights to buy Māori land.

give sovereignty/governance of New Zealand to ….

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Why was land so important to Maori?

Land as stability For an island people, land is hugely important. The traditional Māori world view is based in early Polynesian experience, where whole islands were sometimes lost beneath the sea. The world seemed unstable, as it consisted mainly of water. Land could not be taken for granted.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi relevant today?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. Today the Treaty is widely accepted to be a constitutional document that establishes and guides the relationship between the Crown in New Zealand (embodied by our government) and Māori.

What does the Treaty of Waitangi say about the land?

Treaty of Waitangi and the Land Claims Commission Under the second article of the Treaty of Waitangi, Māori were guaranteed ‘the full, exclusive and undisturbed possession of their lands and estates’, and only the Crown could purchase land from them.

What the treaty means today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. … The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi agree to?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …

Why is it called the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is the founding document of New Zealand. It is an agreement entered into by representatives of the Crown and of Māori iwi (tribes) and hapū (sub-tribes). It is named after the place in the Bay of Islands where the Treaty was first signed, on 6 February 1840.

Who refused the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia NgākutiTāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi. Tāraia was a famous warrior and may have felt that signing would be beneath him.

Was the Treaty of Waitangi successful?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi so important?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected. … requiring the Government to act reasonably and in good faith towards Māori.

How was the Treaty of Waitangi broken?

The land was lost through a combination of private and Government purchases, outright confiscation, and Native Land Court practices that made it difficult for Māori to maintain their land under traditional ownership structures. There were some purchases of Māori land made before the Treaty was signed.