Question: Where We Use Have Had?

Have been or had been?

1 Answer.

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense.

“Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

The past perfect tense refers to something that began in the past and was still true at another time that also was in the past..

Can I say have had?

It is correct, though it too might seem a bit awkward. To understand “had had,” we need to take a look at the present perfect and past perfect tenses. … Present perfect tense uses “has” and “have” plus the past participle, as in “have had” and “has gone.” Now let’s put the chocolate sentence in the past tense.

What is the sentence of had?

They had two adopted children already. Certainly she had been under a lot of stress. A nearby steeple had been broken off short and the fragments lay heaped beside it.

Is have had correct?

We use the present perfect tense when we want to connect the present with the (recent) past in some way and this will appear as has had or have had in full forms or as ‘s had or ‘ve had in contracted forms: … Had had is the past perfect form of have when it is used as a main verb to describe our experiences and actions.

Where do we use had in a sentence?

When you need to talk about two things that happened in the past and one event started and finished before the other one started, place “had” before the main verb for the event that happened first. Here are some more examples of when to use “had” in a sentence: “Chloe had walked the dog before he fell asleep.”

What is have had in grammar?

The past perfect form of have is had had (had + past participle form of have). The past perfect tense is used when we are talking about the past and want to refer back to an earlier past time.

What tense is had?

The Past Perfect tense in English is composed of two parts: the past tense of the verb to have (had) + the past participle of the main verb.

What is the meaning of I have had enough?

SEE SYNONYMS FOR have had enough ON THESAURUS.COM. Want no more of something, as in I’ve had enough of their quarreling. This phrase uses enough in the sense of “an adequate amount,” which is intended ironically to mean “a more than sufficient amount.” [c.

What is the meaning of have had?

“Have had” is using the verb have in the present perfect tense. Consider the present tense sentence: I have a lot of homework. This means that I have a lot of homework now. On the other hand, we use the present perfect tense to describe an event from the past that has some connection to the present.

When to use have had or had?

In the present perfect, the auxiliary verb is always have (for I, you, we, they) or has (for he, she, it). In the past perfect, the auxiliary verb is always had. We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”: I’m not feeling well.

What are examples of had?

Past Perfect Tense ExamplesHad met: She had met him before the party.Had left: The plane had left by the time I got to the airport.Had written: I had written the email before he apologized.Had wanted: Kate had wanted to see the movie, but she did not have money for the ticket.

What is the grammar rule for had?

‘Had’ is the past tense of both ‘has’ and ‘have’.have. Have is used with some pronouns and plural nouns: … has. Has is used with the third person singular. … contractions. I have = I’ve. … negative contractions. … ‘have’ and ‘has’ in questions. … ‘have got’ and ‘have’ … ‘have’ and ‘has’ verb tenses. … modal verbs: ‘have to’More items…•

What is difference between have and had?

The “have” is a present-tense state-of-being verb. The “seen” is a verb without any tense but with the perfect aspect. … In 3), the “had” is a past-tense state-of-being verb.

Have been had meaning?

When someone gets tricked, cheated or decieved, we say that they have been had. Being mistreated, cheated or dealt with badly, is known as being had. This expression uses the verb to have in the sense of getting someone in one’s power or at a disadvantage. Use this well-known idiom in informal situations.