Quick Answer: What Is A Hyperlink Used For?

The definition of a hyperlink is text or an image within a file on your computer that you can click on that gives access to another document or image.

Words on a website that are underlined and highlighted in blue and that you can click on in order to open a new web page are an example of a hyperlink..

A link when used within a web page is called a hyperlink. … In simple terms, a link can be referred to simply as a web address whereas a hyperlink is a link that cross link pages within the same or different websites in the context of the World Wide Web.

Text hyperlink – Uses a word or phrase to take visitors to another page, file or document. Image hyperlink – Uses an image to take visitors to another page, file or document. Bookmark hyperlink – Uses text or an image to take visitors to another part of a web page.

In computing, a hyperlink, or simply a link, is a reference to data that the user can follow by clicking or tapping. A hyperlink points to a whole document or to a specific element within a document. Hypertext is text with hyperlinks. The text that is linked from is called anchor text.

On a computer you can identify a hyperlink even if it’s not underlined by hovering your mouse pointer over the text. A browser changes the pointer from an arrow to a finger to indicate it can be opened. Also, at the bottom of the window the URL of the link should appear to help you identify where the link points.

A hyperlink is a word, phrase, or image that you can click on to jump to a new document or a new section within the current document. Hyperlinks are found in nearly all Web pages, allowing users to click their way from page to page. Text hyperlinks are often blue and underlined, but don’t have to be.

Press Ctrl+K. You can also right-click the text or picture and click Link on the shortcut menu. In the Insert Hyperlink box, type or paste your link in the Address box. Note: If you don’t see the Address box, make sure Existing File or Web Page is selected under Link to.

Most likely problems with opening hyperlinks are connected with either the security restrictions of your Internet browser that doesn’t allow opening pop-up windows, or with your Flash player plug-in that prevents you from opening URLs in local Flash files.

If the hyperlink doesn’t work correctly, troubleshoot the problem by checking the link address, link format and program settings.Check the Original Website. … Check the URL Address. … Domain Structure. … Program Settings.

Chances are good that this weird behavior is an indication that you are seeing the field code for the hyperlink, instead of the result of that field code (just the link itself). Try this the next time you see the weird hyperlink: just move the insertion point somewhere between the two brackets and press Shift+F9.

When you click a hyperlink to another website (assuming you are connected to the internet), this is what happens. … So when you click the link, the text address will be translated into an IP address, something like 213.209. 156.97. The IP address will be used to identify a particular computer.

Highlight the link, right-click on it, and select “Copy.” Then, place your cursor in the Word document where you want the link to go. Right-click and select “Paste.” … If copying and pasting don’t work, try restarting your computer.

Regular use of hyperlinks will improve your SEO and make life easier for your readers….Here are my top 5 reasons for including hyperlinks in your content.Credibility. … Increases page views. … Improves SEO. … Assists the Call to Action. … Usability.

Linking. Most often, a website will connect to another in the form of a link (also known as a “hypertext” link), a specially coded word or image that when clicked upon, will take a user to another Web page. … You do not need permission for a regular word link to another website’s home page.

Anatomy of a link A basic link is created by wrapping the text or other content, see Block level links, inside an element and using the href attribute, also known as a Hypertext Reference, or target, that contains the web address.

First, you can remove selected hyperlinks with Word’s context menu options. Select a link in a document with the cursor. Then you can right-click the link to open the context menu in the shot below. Select the Remove Hyperlink option there to convert the URL to plain text.